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Sizing up enterprises to better understand them

A thesis discussed at the University of Genoa provides an overview of Italian companies analysed according to size

 

Looking at company sizes to better understand how they work and thus be able to make more informed decisions – a “mathematical” take on Luigi Einaudi’s wise motto “first learn and then decide” (though his actual words were “First learn, then discuss, and then decide”). An admonition that is still valid today, in an era when information is widespread yet not proportionally clearer or more exhaustive. Further, an admonition that, with regard to production systems and enterprises, simply means good management with all that it entails in terms of gathering information, processing it and then make the appropriate decisions.

Hence, appraising the size of a company so as to get information on the impact of its activities and determine more appropriate managing policies is a useful exercise. These are the themes around which Matteo Spinosa’s research study revolves – a thesis entitled “Dimensione delle imprese Italiane. Misure ed implicazioni” (“The extent of Italian enterprises. Sizes and implications”) discussed at the University of Genoa, Department of Economics.

In the first section, Spinosa focuses on “researching the definitions and parameters identified by various institutions and in relevant literature so as to establish a corporate size.” He then scrutinises “a few theories that suggest possible determining factors related to size, before considering the implications of different sizes, paying particular attention to growth, innovation and access to credit.” The second section sees theory applied to practice, and includes analyses focused both on Italian enterprises and comparisons with European ones.

Spinosa, in his conclusions, explains that, “The outcome of this study reveals an economic slump in the south of Italy, both in terms of number of companies and average size. Finally, comparisons with Europe highlight the small size of Italian companies, so that Italy’s occupational distribution results similar to that in Slovakia, Slovenia, Lithuania, Bulgaria and Greece, unfortunately nowhere near that of countries it should actually be akin to, such as Germany and France in particular.”

Matteo Spinosa’s paper has the merit of providing readers, within a short space and through clear language, with some basic data analysis that, as mentioned at the beginning, is helpful in better understanding the real state of play, so as to be able to act more effectively.

Dimensione delle imprese Italiane. Misure ed implicazioni (“The extent of Italian enterprises. Sizes and implications”)

Matteo Spinosa

Thesis, University of Genoa, School of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Management Degree programme, 2023

A thesis discussed at the University of Genoa provides an overview of Italian companies analysed according to size

 

Looking at company sizes to better understand how they work and thus be able to make more informed decisions – a “mathematical” take on Luigi Einaudi’s wise motto “first learn and then decide” (though his actual words were “First learn, then discuss, and then decide”). An admonition that is still valid today, in an era when information is widespread yet not proportionally clearer or more exhaustive. Further, an admonition that, with regard to production systems and enterprises, simply means good management with all that it entails in terms of gathering information, processing it and then make the appropriate decisions.

Hence, appraising the size of a company so as to get information on the impact of its activities and determine more appropriate managing policies is a useful exercise. These are the themes around which Matteo Spinosa’s research study revolves – a thesis entitled “Dimensione delle imprese Italiane. Misure ed implicazioni” (“The extent of Italian enterprises. Sizes and implications”) discussed at the University of Genoa, Department of Economics.

In the first section, Spinosa focuses on “researching the definitions and parameters identified by various institutions and in relevant literature so as to establish a corporate size.” He then scrutinises “a few theories that suggest possible determining factors related to size, before considering the implications of different sizes, paying particular attention to growth, innovation and access to credit.” The second section sees theory applied to practice, and includes analyses focused both on Italian enterprises and comparisons with European ones.

Spinosa, in his conclusions, explains that, “The outcome of this study reveals an economic slump in the south of Italy, both in terms of number of companies and average size. Finally, comparisons with Europe highlight the small size of Italian companies, so that Italy’s occupational distribution results similar to that in Slovakia, Slovenia, Lithuania, Bulgaria and Greece, unfortunately nowhere near that of countries it should actually be akin to, such as Germany and France in particular.”

Matteo Spinosa’s paper has the merit of providing readers, within a short space and through clear language, with some basic data analysis that, as mentioned at the beginning, is helpful in better understanding the real state of play, so as to be able to act more effectively.

Dimensione delle imprese Italiane. Misure ed implicazioni (“The extent of Italian enterprises. Sizes and implications”)

Matteo Spinosa

Thesis, University of Genoa, School of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Management Degree programme, 2023